Finding Freedom

Riverside has successfully reintroduced 19 Vervet troops, 2 baboon troops, and several individual Bushbabies and other animals back into the wild. Here are highlighted some of Riverside's reintroduction successes!

2014-2015 Releases

 

 

 

Location: Wydehoek, Mokopane, Limpopo

 

Size: 7000 Hectares

 

Number of Troops: 4

 

 

 

 

 

In 2014 Riverside Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre successfully released two of it's Vervet Monkey troops at Wydehoek. The first was our Jurgens troop consisting of 30 monkeys, and at the second location, the Cape troop, consisting of 27 monkeys. There have been 3 babies born to the 19th release troop and at least 1 born in the 18th release troop so far during this year's baby season, so it seems they are thriving, happy and healthy. 

 

There have been some obstacles in the way of bush fires at the release site, but Riverside and it's Monkeys have been very lucky to have stayed out of harms way, and the Volunteers and staff have assisted in the firefighting along with the property owners and neighbours. We are so lucky to have such a great support team during this time! 

 

The 20th Vervet Troop to be released will be in 2015 shortly, followed by the release of our baboon troop! Stay tuned for updates and photos! You can also follow us on Facebook to see how the releases are progressing. 

Here young Noam (Israel) assists in processing the monkeys for release. 

Here the monkeys are situated inside the release enclosure awaiting to be released inside. Here they will remain for 2 weeks whilst they adjust to theie new surroundings

Here one of the Vervet Monkeys begins to explore and forage in the trees of the release enclosure. 

Baboon Release - October 2011

 

Location: Kondowe, Limpopo

 

Size: 4000 Hectares

 

Number of Troops: 1

 

Number of Troop Members: 24

 

Included in this release was Daisy who was hand reared at Riverside from just weeks old. Just days before the release she gave birth to her first baby and the two were released together along with Riverside favourite, Al Pacino - the troop's Alpha male. Al Pacino and troop were spotted in 2013 by volunteers when the site was visited to check up on the baboons. He saw the vehicle coming from a great distance and hastily called his troop into the bush where they were not seen again - wild at last. 

Vervet Monkey Release - February 2011

 

Location: Kondowe, Limpopo

 

Size: 4000 Hectares

 

Number of Troops: 2

 

Number of Troop Members: 24

 

This release included a baby reared at Riverside called Dippy/Blanche and one called Peanut. Dippy's mother was hit by a car when she was only four weeks old and Peanut's was killed by dogs, and the troop would not keep her. They spent 3 years at Riverside under rehabilitation before being successfully reintroduced into the wild. 

Vervet Monkey Release - September, 2009

 

Location: Shikwaro, Limpopo

 

Size: 1500 Hectares

 

Number of Troops: 1

 

Number of Troop Members: 38

 

This troop included 6 pregnant females which would shortly put the troop up to 44 individuals, plus a few babies born in the rehabilitation enclosure. This is good news for our troops, as it shows they are reproductively viable and will be able to sustain their population in the wild.  The troop was spotted during a 2013 visit by Bob and Lynne. 

Vervet Monkey Release - July, 2009

 

Location: Riverside, Limpopo

 

Size: 2000 Hectares

 

Number of Troops: 2

 

Number of Troop Members: 24 and 34

 

Over a period of over 15 years of study, it was apparent that the area where Riverside is located was lacking in its ntural Vervet monkey population. Riverside released 2 troops of monkeys in the area to replenish the natural population and to resea

Vervet Monkey Release - May, 2008

 

Location: Ferndale, Eastern Cape

 

Size: 4500 Hectares

 

Number of Troops: 1

 

Number of Troop Members: 49

 

Riverside's affiliate rehabilitation centre, Debracey, in the Eastern Cape asked for help to reintroduce a troop of their rehabilitated Vervet monkeys. 

Vervet Monkey Release - November, 2006

 

Location: Imbabala, Limpopo

 

Size: 1000 Hectares

 

Number of Troops: 1

 

Number of Troop Members: 38

 

These 38 monkeys were released in Imabala with the pleasurable consent of the landowners and neighbours who were aware of the plight of Vervets in South Africa and wanted to bring back these Primate to their native territory. 

 

 

Vervet Monkey Release - April, 2006

 

Location: Entabeni, Limpopo

 

Size: 23000 Hectares

 

Number of Troops: 1

 

Number of Troop Members: 24

 

 

Vervet Monkey Relocation - May, 2006

 

Location: Dinokeng, Gauteng

 

Size: 15000 Hectares

 

Number of Troops: 2

 

Number of Troop Members: 

 

In 2006, RWRC capture and relocate 2 troops of Vervet monkeys from the city of Pretoria.. These monkeys came into close contact with humans as their habit was depleted over time and they were considered to be a nuissence. They were riddled with bullets and pellets, some so badly they could not be saved. The ones that could were relocated and now live peacefully in their new location, happy and healthy, and away from human encroachment. 

 

Filmed by: SABC News and French Media

Vervet Monkey Release - July, 2003

 

Location: Blackhills, Limpopo

 

Size: 3000 Hectares

 

Number of Troops: 2

 

Number of Troop Members: 31

 

Filmed by Adrian Cale - U.K.)

 

 

Vervet Monkey Release - 1999, 2000, 2001

 

Location: Lamotte, Limpopo

 

Size: 3000 Hectares

 

Number of Troops: 3

 

Number of Vervet monkeys: 103

 

(Filmed by Dieren Neste - Belgium)

 

 

Vervet Monkey Release - April 1998

 

Location: Thaka Zulu, KZN

 

Size: 60000 Hectares

 

Number of Troops: 1

 

Number of Troop Members: 40

 

Filmed by: SABC - 50/50 Wildlife Program

Vervet Monkey Release - 1994

 

Location: Parsons, Witbank - Mpumalanga

 

Size: 1000 Hectares

 

Number of Troops: 1

National Geographic

"Freaks and Creeps" - 2012

 

Typically South Africa is known for the Big Five: lions, leopards, buffalo, elephants and rhinos. But not for Lucy Cooke, advocate and avenger for the lesser-known and unloved animals of the world. Lucy’s on a hunt for the more enigmatic Freaky Five: Cape vultures, sungazer girdled lizards, golden-brown baboon tarantulas, ground pangolins, and chacma baboons.

 

The Freaky Five are all important to South Africans and their traditions. Mystical and mysterious, these five animals represent a side of South African culture that the tourists and conservation donors both often overlook. But Lucy Cooke is on a mission to change all of that!

 

(Riverside segment begins at 32min)

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