How Your Donation Will Help Riverside

The cost of propern care and maintenance of a rehabilitation centre is astronomical. Riverside Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre is not government funded and depends on the volunteer program's financial contributions to run the day to day operations.

 

There is a misperception that the South African government sponsors the activities at wildlife rehabilitation centres.

 

The actual feeding cost of the centre per year:

*450 Vervet + 7 Samango monkeys x R5.20 per day = R2340.00 x 365 days =R 854,100.00 (£47956 or $79010)

*85 Chacma baboons x R15.60 per day = R 1326.00 per day x 365 = R 481,800.00 (£27052 or $44569)

*TOTAL = R1,335,900.00 or £75,008 or $123,579 PER YEAR just for food for the animals.

 

Here is a list of purchases we need to make on a regular basis to allow the animals to continue their rehabilitation programme and be reintroduced back into the wild:

Food

Any Amount Counts!

We have to buy fresh fruits and vegetables for the animals at the centre daily: i.e. cabbage, bananas, papayas, oranges, melons, eggplants, peppers, carrots, bread, maize meal etc. A wide variety is important for the health of our animals.

 

R6600 (£370 or €445 or $610) enables us to purchase specially formulated pellets for the monkeys and baboons for 3 months

Microchip

R 300 (£17 or €21 or $28)

 

This donation will pay for one microchip that each animal admitted to Riverside will have inserted for identification purposes. This microchip becomes their 'personal identification number' for the rest of their lives.

Animal Pick-Up

R 2000 for a 10 hour trip (£112 or €135 or $185)

 

Because Riverside Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre is recognised by the SA government and the public we receive weekly calls to collect primates in need and also to assist with primate/wildlife/human conflict.. We also assist the South African Government with their animal confiscations to provide transport and care for the animals. Some past recues were over 2000 km from Riverside, which took 4 days. 

 

Their is a misperception that government pays for our rescue and care assistance. All costs are fon our dime. This means we have to pay for petrol and toll fees. This fee does not include vehicle maintenance, payment for time for staff to drive, food and drink for staff members or accommodation during any journey. 

Releases

R 65000 (£3660 or €4400 or $6000)

 

Calculating the overall costs of 17 Vervet and 1 baboon reintroduction, the average amounts to R65000.

 

This includes, but is not limited to: transport/petrol, payment of staff, feeding animals and staff, equipment to erect a temporary enclosure, accommodation (ablution + kitchen) on the release site, chemical immobilization of the animals upon capture and processing (health screening and micro-chip if necessary), prophylactic treatment i.e. deworming...

 

This year (2014-2015) we are planning releases of 2 Vervet troops and the baboon troop. Our rehabilitated Primates depend on the generosity and the volunteer man-hours of people like yourself to assist with this massive undertaking!

 

Enclosures

R 129603.00 (£7276 or $11,989)

Construction Material of a 4 Ha baboon rehab enclosure, 200m x 200m x 2,4m high plus 18m x 6m x 2,4m high Introduction Enclosure & secure entrance. All the mesh wire is secured in a 150mm x 400mm deep concrete foundation to prevent animals from digging out and to prevent predators or other wildlife digging in.

 

The following table is an estimate on the material for a 4 Ha Baboon Rehabilitation Enclosure: for Chacma baboons or Vervet monkeys.

 

 

Material Description

Unit

Qty

Item Price/R

Amount

114mm Dia x 3m long x 4mm wall thickness galvanised Straining post - 

 

42mm Dia x 3m long x 3mm wall thickness intermediate posts - galvanised

 

80mm x 40mm x 1.6mm x 6m long Rectangular tubing for roof trusses – galvanised

 

25mm x 2.5mm x 25mm x 5.5m long Square Tubing for gates

 

Galvanised corrugated roof sheeting for introduction enclosure

 

4mm Dia galvanised wire x 50Kg rolls for fencing

 

2mm Dia soft galvanised wire for securing fencing to straining wires, posts, gates and introduction enclosure roof structure

 

2,4m x 30m long 50mm aperture x 2,5mm Dia roll diamond mesh

 

400mm x 10mm Dia straining eye bolts for straining wires

 

Cement for concrete of posts and introduction enclosure floor ( 17m³)

 

Nail-on insulators for electric wires

 

Heavy duty galvanised tensioners

 

Black strainers for elec wires

 

2mm Dia galvanised high tensile wire for elec wiring, 50 Kg rolls

 

Meps energiser + battery + solar panel

 

Consumables e.g. hire of concrete mixer, petrol, welding rods, paint, bolts and nuts, shade cloth

 

Each

 

 

Each

 

 

Each

 

 

 

Each

 

 

 

 

Each

 

 

Each

 

 

 

 

Each

 

 

Each

 

 

Bags

 

 

Each

 

Each

 

Each

 

Rolls

 

 

Item

 

Item

42

 

 

258

 

 

14

 

 

 

4

 

 

36

 

 

4

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

18

 

 

18

 

 

130

 

 

7200

 

288

 

288

 

12

 

 

1

273.00

 

 

108.00

 

 

156.00

 

 

 

105.75

 

 

90.00

 

 

700.00

 

 

800.00

 

 

 

 

1500.00

 

 

14.00

 

 

79.00

 

 

1.20

 

16.00

 

1.20

 

800.00

11466.00

 

 

27864.00

 

 

2184.00

 

 

 

423.00

 

 

3240.00

 

 

2800.00

 

 

800.00

 

 

 

 

27000.00

 

 

252.00

 

 

10270.00

 

 

8640.20

 

4608.00

 

3456.00

 

9600.00

 

 

7000.00

 

10000.00

 

 

 

 

R 129603.00

 

Please note: The Riverside special species enclosure design is the most cost effective way of building a rehabilitation enclosure e.g. R129603.00 / 40000m² = R3.24 per m².

 

New Location

± R 2,000,000.00 (£112500 or €135200 or $185,000).

 

There will be a new dam built just beyond the Riverside Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre property. This is expected to flood about 50% of the facilities including enclosures, volunteer dorms and working facilities. The South African government has confirmed that there will be no compensation as this is to provide water (life resource) for the local communities.

 

The plan has been postponed to the end of 2016 because the government decided to first raise the Tzaneen dam wall which would take 3 years. 

 

Relocation is time comsuming (which we don't have) and it would take approximately 2 years to re-establish the Riverside's facilities.


We will keep you updated of the situation as we learn more.

 

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